Responsible and authentic travel has always relied on crowdsourced information. And it is crowdsourced information that can regenerate tourism in its time of need.

Crowdsourced Information Has Always Been Essential To Travel

Accessing reliable information from the travel crowd has been essential for travellers since long before the Internet. Over the last 20 years it’s become integral to how we travel.

Forums, blogs, reviews, social media posts — travellers take information from the crowd to decide what to do, where to eat, where to visit and how to travel smartly. In-destination advice is equally valuable, whether from a hotel concierge, another traveller or a local. …


How can travellers be responsible for spreading Covid-19 by visiting places where Covid-19 has already spread?

In times of crisis we look for somebody or something to blame. As Covid-19 spreads around the world we have been quick to blame people who travel.

Tourism has been blamed for coronavirus, be it skiers at a European resort in February, business travellers going to and from China, or the selfish travellers who don’t understand that they need to stay at home and stop moving, just for once.

It’s easy to blame travellers. Travellers are nameless. The definition of travellers can be incredibly broad. …


Like so many of you reading, myself and the people at TripSafe have watched on as decades of hard work have been destroyed in six devastating months.

2020 has been terrible for tourism, for hospitality, for small businesses, for almost everyone who has put their life into creating something. 2020 has been a year when so much has unraveled.

We at TripSafe are a team of travel professionals who have watched our travel businesses all but disappear.

We believe that blaming tourism for coronavirus is simple convenience and it’s ruining communities, businesses, livelihoods, even entire countries.

We’re tired of tourism being blamed and scapegoated for coronavirus, especially after all the precautions and sacrifices tourism has made. …


The travel app TripSafe is encouraging people to travel more and to travel now. What do you think about that? As a second coronavirus wave sweeps around Europe and elsewhere, TripSafe argues that almost everyone can and should be travelling now.

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“Irresponsible people spread coronavirus, not responsible travellers” says Stepan Borovec, founder of the not-for-profit app TripSafe. “It’s the same virus everywhere, yet tourism is blamed for spreading coronavirus in places where coronavirus has already spread.”

Tourism supports 10.4% of the global economy and 1 in 11 jobs worldwide. Back in June 2020, as restrictions were being lifted, the World Travel & Tourism Council was already predicting 197.5 million travel and tourism job losses and a USD 5.5 trillion loss to global GDP. …


Before you abuse me, can we at least open a conversation?

I travel. I work in travel. And I want people to keep travelling, during the coronavirus pandemic. I want people to travel more, now and in the future. But as I kneel with my head in the gallows, ready for the barrage of rotting fruit and viral attacks on my irresponsibility, let me at least spout some final words.

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Restaurant owners in Northern Italy wait for tourism to return

Back in March I wrote about the challenges of travelling during the pandemic. To summarise the response, I was a privileged white millennial male, recklessly endangering lives, and destroying communities. …


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Karakorum was the capital of the Mongol Empire and relics from Genghis Khan’s time still remain. Hear tales of the emperor’s conquests and enjoy lunch with a view towards the mountains.

Stone ruins dot the landscape, reminders of when Karakorum was the capital city of the largest empire to ever grace the world. An expert local guide joins you today and provides a detailed history lesson into Khan’s marauding.

Explore the Erdene Zuu monastery and admire its almost 100 temples, each of them looking resplendent beneath a rich blue sky. The vast complex is still home to practicing Lamas. Say hello to the spiritual monks in ascetic shrines and wander across picturesque courtyards that reveal a 14th century glory.

Originally published at https://kated.com.


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Beech forests soar across the landscape. Unusual birds flutter their vibrant wings. You keep walking, up and up and up towards the border with Chile. This trek is tough, ascending a mighty, cone-shaped stratovolcano.

Snow dominates the summit all months of the year and you rise through the zones, from open Patagonian plains to forests and icy wilderness. From all angles it’s a postcard and from the summit you enjoy limitless views across Chile and Argentina.

It will take two days to reach the peak and come back down, two days of tough mountaineering and insatiable rewards. This is a private tour and you will have porters doing the mundane stuff, so you can just hike, camp and hike some more.

Originally published at https://kated.com.


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You are paddling on deep turquoise amid mighty rocks, in hidden lagoons of transparent emerald, into secret caves of dark blue. The guide helps you find marine life, although dolphins and whales are usually easy to find.

Next you are on the ferry, headed for the lone and wild Channel Islands. Take your snorkel, and dive into this underwater wonderland.

The underwater plants sway to a secret rhythm. And you know the shy creatures of the sea are hiding very close. Let them get used to your presence and show themselves. You will see orange garibaldis, sea fans, rays, anemones, and countless other animals and plants. The kelp forests of the Channel Islands are among the richest marine ecosystems in the world.

Originally published at https://kated.com.


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Hike through the jungle, past a sublime waterfall. Travel up the muddy waters of the Rio Chagres in a long dugout canoe, and enter into the domain of the Embera people.

Members of an Embera tribe in their colorful traditional dress will meet you on the river bank and show you how they live off the land. Learn of the tribe’s history, traditions, and culture from the village chief himself.

Connect with this authentic culture. Sit in on a traditional dance replete with drumming and rousing song. See beautiful baskets and beaded items and even decorate your body with a temporary tattoo in the Embera style.

Originally published at https://kated.com.


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Colombia’s Pacific Coast is a paradise for adventure in pristine and isolated environments. This is the lesser visited side of a lesser visited South American country. You can appreciate the rugged coastline and dense jungle with few distractions and little interruptions.

Take a kayak or longboard off the coast in Nuqui. As you paddle with just the sounds of the water lapping against you, you’ll feel completely absorbed by your surroundings. Look out for dolphins and whales surfacing nearby, and birds circling overhead.

You can also utilize the guidance of an expert surfer if you want to take a lesson in the warm Pacific waters.

Originally published at https://kated.com.

About

Stephen Bailey

Realising the one true and noble function of our time — move.

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